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Episode 01: What is Dr. Dark Web Web and Why Did We Even Dare?

February 02, 2022

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Dr. Dark Web is a podcast powered by Cybersixgill for anyone inside, or wanting to peer into the Information Security realm who’s looking for practical ways to catch threats before they become incidents.

In each episode, Chris Roberts, Hacker, Researcher and Advisor, will take you on a journey to uncover the best ways to incorporate threat intelligence within your organization.

Whether you’re on the frontlines battling the latest threats or leading the overall defense strategy within your company, Dr. Dark Web will take you on a tour of the underground and help you prepare for what’s really out there.

Podcast Insights

🎙️ We are analog humans in a digital world.

People live under this misconception that we have figured out the internet. Unfortunately, that’s not true. Although we use it every day, we’ve only scratched the surface. What’s happening underneath will remain a mystery to the majority. That’s why we should look at the internet as an inexhaustible source of possibilities that could easily “decide” to work against us. 

🎙️ Data is the most valuable asset in today’s world.

Technology has almost erased the line between the physical and digital space, and the way the world operates is all about available data. Therefore, in each episode, we will focus on educating audiences regarding the measures that need to be taken so that our movement through the digital space is as secure as possible. 

🎙️ Dr. Dark Web: Mission before money.

What distinguishes our podcast from other security-themed ones is that we will encourage audience participation by enabling them to ask questions. The topics we plan to cover require two-way communication. We want to help you understand the importance of security in the online space and give you the option of asking questions whenever you have doubts. 

Episode Highlights

Who’s Behind the Dr. Dark Web Podcast?

”The ‘who’ is an interesting one. I’ve been creeping around this industry since it began and, in some ways, [it’s] not quite the IT industry. […] But when I started messing around with this stuff, in 1980, I was in boarding school. Boarding school and I did not get along with each other—something about rules and regulations. I started messing around with computers there.

I was like nine, ten years old, and one of the kids in school had got himself a Sinclair, one of those old ZX80s. So a whole 4k of RAM; that’s all you had to play with. 

And, we ended up building a joystick for this thing. We built all sorts of other stuff by just tinkering, by playing around, by hacking, and by trying to figure out what made it work, why it worked, what this thing was, and how it worked. 

[…] I started working; I did night shift cooking when I was 15 and 16, and then, ended up going into this industry for a while as a tech—screwdriver in one hand, floppy disk in the other hand, and going around figuring this out.

We all joke about it nowadays, but back then, you didn’t have a huge amount of support, so we were figuring it out on the fly. And then, I did a bunch of other jobs and then I went into the military and jumped out of airplanes for a living. 

Came out of doing that and went back into this industry, got yelled at again, back to the whole attitude of, ‘Well, you’re not going to listen, so we’re just going to show you what the problem is,’ which is great until you start moving people’s money around. And then, all of a sudden, the rules change.

And especially, if you move big institutions’ money around. Apparently, when you move it across borders and out of countries, they get all dirty about it, even if you are proving a point. So we got pretty well yelled at for that one, and that was, I say, moving towards the mid-late nineties. So we were starting to get these ‘What’s going to happen in the year 2000?’ shenanigans.

I was still in the UK, but I’d been sent to various other places around Europe. […] Stayed in the industry most of the time, took a break, went down to Bolivia, went climbing, went up to Alaska, went climbing for six months. 

I took a break out of it, got dragged back into it, when 2000/2001 came along, and I’ve been there ever since. But it’s always been one of those where I have my day job. I have my regular ‘Here’s the job I have to work at, earn money to pay for things,’ and then I’m always tinkering, and trying to find out what makes something tick.

It’s been a fun journey. I’m in my early fifties, but I’m still as enthused as I was years ago. I’ve just got a few more war wins to go with it. Now, the place drives me more nuts in this day and age, but I still enjoy digging and finding and checking and seeing and all that kind of good stuff.”

Who Should Listen to Dr. Dark Web?

”When you think about the internet and how it is, at the end of the day, it isn’t this object that’s separated from us. A ridiculously good friend of mine, Ryan Cloutier, says that we are analog humans in a digital world.

And he’s right. We can understand how a car works because we can see and feel it, but when you start talking about the internet, it’s not tactile. We can touch the cameras, play with the microphones, and all these things. But, you can’t see the bits and bytes flowing.

You don’t know, unfortunately, how much of you is being harvested. You, the individual, or you, the company. Nobody walks up to you, smacks you on the head, and walks off with your wallet. They do, unfortunately, sometimes. But in the digital world, that can happen so easily, so effectively, and we just don’t know it’s occurred.

[…] So when you look at who should listen in, I’d almost argue that everybody [should]. I hope that my mother will listen to it. I’ll probably get the telephone call but, at the same time, I want my mother to understand that the computer or the iPad or the devices she has have some amazing capabilities; but, they should also come with some warning signs, which unfortunately they don’t. 

So when you use certain programs or when you use certain software, when you interact with certain services and systems, you should at least understand what you are handing over and, unfortunately, most people don’t. So when you think about it, it doesn’t say, ‘Don’t do it.’ It’s not saying, ‘Don’t use it’, because that’ll never happen; it’s about going in with your eyes wide open.” 

Why Should You Listen to Dr. Dark Web?

”Now, this is where the fun turns up. I’m looking forward to this. Dani, you and I have been working on this for a while now; we’ve got some core pieces of the jigsaw puzzle. 

We’re not focusing just on one thing. We’re going to take the jigsaw puzzle, which is intelligence and data, and go, ‘Hey, how would leadership do something with it? How would somebody who is on the frontline do something with it? How would an analyst deal with it? How do we deal with it? How do we find it? What is it?’

You start breaking all of this down, and all of a sudden, that jigsaw puzzle that is that nebulous dark map starts getting a bit of a light shone on it. You start to see, ‘Hey, this is why we look at it; this is why this is useful.’ 

So it’s helping the various people understand why these bits of the jigsaw are useful and who they are useful to in an organization. Is it a leadership risk decision or a tactical decision about a human or a piece of technology? 

Is it an awareness discussion to have with the technical teams, the development teams, or the systems teams? Or for the standard users to go, ‘Hey, guess what? Our leadership is a bit vocal, and we’re out on the internet a lot. You’re all at risk. Here’s how to help you understand the types of risks you’re facing.’ It’s so useful for anybody, it depends upon which tool you want to use.”

The Guest List

”I’m looking forward to bringing on some good friends to talk about what they’re doing with intelligence, to talk about what they’re doing inside their organizations, what backgrounds they have with threat intelligence, and how they are using this threat intelligence.

I’m looking forward to digging into the knowledge and experience that Cybersixgill brings. […] We’re going to have people help us understand how tactics work, which tactics [to use], how we modify [them], and how we advance them because they continually change.”

What Distinguishes Dr. Dark Web from Other Security-Themed Podcasts?

”We have such a diverse schedule—[that’s] a fundamental way of putting it. If you think about it, Dani, you’ve done an amazing job. I’m looking at the spreadsheet for the next 12 months, and there’s a ton of it filled in for everybody that’s listening to this; it’s crazy.

[…] I also think there isn’t a very good, consistent message when it comes to using stuff that’s hidden on the darker side of the internet and when it comes to talking about threat intelligence, and we’re talking actual threat intelligence. 

For me, I think it’ll be fun because we’ll take a situation, and we can apply an educational discussion to it. Again, I want my mother to look at this and go, ‘I understand what’s going on.’

I also want to put a leadership twist on this and go, ‘Hey, how can you use this effectively?’ And then, let’s face it. We also have an open mic session, which is the crazy Dr. Dark Web stuff that I’m looking forward to.”

Transcript

[00:00:00] Chris Roberts: I think this is what another one of the things of security.  This is a journey. This isn’t going to end. So the more you understand the theater that you’re operating, the more you understand the situations,  the better the chance you have of actually staying on this path of this journey and not getting sideswiped by somebody who’s basically wanting to take it all from you. If anything, I think people need to know who you are. Just take me through your backstory. Who are you? How’d you get into the field, and why the Dark web?

[00:01:09] The “who” is an interesting one. I mean, I think fortunate. I mean, I’ve been creeping around this industry since it began, when you really think about it. And, in some ways not quite the IT industry, I really don’t go back to like, you know, second world war times. Family does, but I don’t.

[00:01:25] But when I started messing around with this stuff, 1980, when you think about it, I was in boarding school. So I spent almost a year in boarding school, not a complete year in boarding school, but almost a year in boarding school. Boarding school and I did not get on with each other. Something about rules and regulations and, you know. So I started messing around with computers there.

[00:01:44] Chris Roberts: I was, like, 9, 10 years old, and one of the kids in school, uh, had got himself a Sinclair, one of the old Xanax80 and Xanax81. So a whole 4k of RAM. That was it. That’s all you had to play with. And, we ended up building a joystick for this thing. We built all sorts of other stuff by just tinkering, by playing around, uh, by hacking and by trying to figure out, you know, basically what made it work,

[00:02:09] why did it work, what was this thing and how did it work. And then, from there, you know, I messed around with them for a little bit longer, but then I took a break ’cause I ended up coming back to, family were over in another country and because boarding school and I didn’t agree with each other, I went back and that caused some concerns

[00:02:26] so they ended up going back to England. So I went to a good old pop standard, normal, what they call comprehensive school in the UK, which is from, like, 11 to 15. So when in the middle of that, like, I was about 12 or 13, I figured out that the computers in the library were of interest and had all sorts of fun stuff on them and started tinkering and messing around with them.

[00:02:45] And at home, I got a, one of the older tare systems, the home game system. And, I’m a little competitive, is probably a very nice way to put it, and I hated losing the games so I would load these games up, and we’re talking back on, when, I mean, the cartridges, they had cartridges, but we also, also had a cassette or I saved up and bought cassette plates and loading them the darker setting, waiting for the damn game to load up,

[00:03:11] and then I’m like, “Okay, well,” again, back to the early days is, “What is it? How does it work? What makes it?” And, I’m reading through all the magazines and other things. Ended up buying myself a modem coupler. So good old telephones, proper router, Dell, track it in and off you go. And, poor mother’s phone bill at the time

[00:03:28] wasn’t, wasn’t that good, unfortunately, so I found out how to actually mess around with good old British Telecom, so I apologize in advance for that, what, 40 years ago, 35 years ago, messing around with all their systems. But figured all this out, and then, uh, parents, unfortunately, went their separate ways and, uh, I was none too happy with that situation.

[00:03:51] And, uh, my father and I, at the time, we’ve had a pretty fractious relationship again, you know, rebellion all this stuff. And, he was very military, very military at home, very military at work, and I took my, one of the parts I took revenge on him leaving was I basically war dialed the entire town I lived in until I figured out where the bank’s modem was.

[00:04:13] And, I’ve done all the research and everything else on the background, all the forums, and ended up moving money out of his account into an account, master criminal here, moved it into an account in my name woo-hoo. Yeah. So the, uh, the police, my father had obviously realized his bank account didn’t have anything left in it,

[00:04:29] got hold of the bank, and the bank was like, “Well, yes, we see a transaction. Oh, look, a new account.” And, my father was the one that had me arrested and the police turned up on the doorstep. My mother was like, “Christopher, bear for you.” And so, this was yeah, 14, 15 years old, and so they didn’t know what the heck to do with me.

[00:04:47] And, I had no clue what the heck to do with me. The bank was like, ” Make it go away.” The police were like,”Pffff” so they ended up confiscating the Atari and the friend’s Commodore that I’d been using for doing some of the other work outside. So my friend had Commodore, I think it was the 64 and I ended up buying, like, a Commodore 128, you know, 8 period of time later.

[00:05:05] So yeah, that was the intro. That, I mean, that was literally the start. So, I mean, we’re going back 19, you know, ’85, ’85, ’86 timeframe. And then, like, and then I’ve worked, I mean, I started working, I did night shift cooking when I was 15 and 16, and then from there ended up going into this industry for a while as a, as a tech, you know. Screwdriver in one hand, floppy disk in the other hand, and going ’round figuring, figuring, we were figuring this out.

[00:05:37] I mean, we all joke about it nowadays, but back then, you really didn’t have a huge amount of support, so we were figuring it out on the fly. And then, uh, I did a bunch of other jobs, like, a bunch of other jobs, and then went into the military and jumped out of airplanes for a living. Hence the, hence the the healthy hero shirt, uh, which is one of the British, British institutions that look after folks that are in, coming out disabled or need some help.

[00:06:02] So yeah. I did that, jumped out of airplanes for a living. Came out of doing that and went back into this industry, got yelled at again, back to the whole attitude of, “Well, you’re not going to listen, so we’re just going to show you what the problem is,” which is great until you start moving people’s money around. And then, all of a sudden the rules change.

[00:06:22] And especially, if you move big institutions’ money around, apparently when you move it across borders and out of countries, they get all that wapiti about it. Even if you’re just proving a point. So we got pretty well yelled at for that one, and that was, I say, mid, moving towards the mid-late nineties, so we were starting to get this whole, uh, what’s going to happen in the year 2000 shenanigans.

[00:06:46] And, I was still based in the, well, I was in the UK, but I’d been, as being sent to various other places around Europe and, uh, ’98 rolls around and we’re doing war games with the US, and, um, standard British mentality, “I will show the yanks a finger or two,” and we did. We just, we went through their systems, like, a hot knife through butter and it wasn’t pretty, and they weren’t too happy because apparently, we set all sorts of alarms off at all sorts of interesting places.

[00:07:16] I mean, we started disabling stuff, messing with stuff. I mean, we were, we were having fun. We were still kids. I mean, still the military mindset, but I mean, we were a bunch of tinkerers and hackers who were basically exploring around some very interesting systems apparently we shouldn’t have been able to explore.

[00:07:32] And so, the United States of America land that sent an airplane over and said, “I say, you uppity individuals, would you mind coming back with us?” you know. Basically, it was like, “Get your ass is on the plane and fix the shit,” was probably a slightly more realistic view of it. So, uh, the, the folks I was working with at the time were like, “Go figure it all out.”

[00:07:53] And, I’ve been over here ever since. Stayed in the industry most of the time, took a break, uh, went down to Bolivia, went climbing, went up to Alaska, went climbing for, like, six months. Took a break out of it, got dragged back into it, when, uh, 2000, 2001 came along, and I’ve been, I’ve been there ever since, but it’s been, always been one of those ones where I have, like, my day job, you know. I have my regular “here’s the job

[00:08:16] I have to work at, earn money to pay for things,” and then I’ve always got this hide, which is, I mean, you can’t see everything that’s behind me, but we’ll have to do a tour of us one day, there’s, like, cabinets here, there are best things, there’s stuff, and it’s always tinkering and it’s always trying to find out what makes something tick.

[00:08:34] You know, we were taking the light bulbs to pieces, um, because in the old days with the old and light bulbs, the, the standard ones, you could actually shine a laser at the light bulb and listening on the conversation in a room. It’s actually kind of a fun, little thing to do nowadays. You can’t do that because the down things are all internet of things and this and that.

[00:08:55] Like, your electronics, you can’t shine the laser, the stupid thing goes oh, so you have to find a better way. So we ended up taking all these light bulbs to pieces and figured out how to turn them into listening devices. And it’s just the tinkering, is through doing fun stuff. And so, I’ve always done that,

[00:09:09] then you combine that with that thirst of knowledge and the open when you think about, like, layers of a cake if you just think about the internet as these layers of a cake, you can Google stuff and this day and age, you get an amazing amount of stuff on Google. Well, then you’re like, “What else is there?” So then you start digging in.

[00:09:27] You’re like, “Well, that was Google, but here is,” let’s just say, “Library of Congress,” or, you know, “The British Library,” it’s behind either a paywall or a register wall. So you can look at this stuff and be like, “Okay, this is even cooler.” Then you go like, “Well, what else is there?” Then you start looking at the darker side of the world and the, the dark there, the, the internet, the stuff that’s basically hidden behind

[00:09:47] torn onion, and I think what’s interesting to know is it’s not all negative stuff there. There is obviously a ton of negative stuff, which we’ll get into as we go through this entire series, but there’s some amazing resources there. As you start digging into those resources, and then you’re like, “Well, that’s kind of cool. Well, what else is there?”

[00:10:05] And then, you start digging into the hidden areas behind all of that stuff, where you literally crack open the door, hand over your passcode, and then you’re getting to show, you know, the, in the most workings, you know. The analogy that used to be used years ago was the matrix. I mean, it was, you know, this, the films being at 20 plus years, and there was always that analogy of, you know, how deep does the rabbit hole go,

[00:10:27] and we’ve gotta be very careful with that because you can very quickly, easily go down certain rabbit holes and end up in a conspiratorial theory where you don’t leave the house and you’re wearing a blasted, you know, a Nomex suit lined with tin foil all the time, or you accept risk and you deal with it accordingly.

[00:10:49] So yeah, it’s been kind of a fun journey. Yeah, I’m, what am I now, I’m in my fifties, early fifties, thankfully, touch wood, but I’m still as enthused as I was years ago. I’ve just got a few more war wins to go with it. Now, the place drives me more nuts in this day and age, but I still enjoy digging and finding and checking and seeing and all that kind of good stuff.

[00:11:12] Dani Woolf: So we’re going to be digging and finding and tinkering on the series, what, I mean, why, why is it important for our audience to listen in on this and who should be listening in on this?

[00:11:29] Chris Roberts: Ooh, now that is a good question, isn’t it? If you go back, when you got into the car, you had to understand how the drive thing worked, for the most part. And, even today’s day and age, you know, I brought my daughter up to understand how to change things, understand things, blah, blah, blah.

[00:11:42] How do I actually know what a car actually does? You understand what the heck makes something tick. Now, when you think about the internet and you think about how it is, at the end of the day, it isn’t this object that’s separated from us. The ridiculously good friend of mine, Ryan Clothier, says that we are analog humans in a digital world,

[00:12:03] and he’s very, very right. We can understand how a car works because we can see, and we can feel it, but when you start talking about the internet, we, it’s not tactile. It’s not tactile very much. We can touch the cameras, we can play with the microphones, with all these things. You can’t actually see the bits and bytes flowing.

[00:12:21] You don’t know, unfortunately, how much of you is being harvested? You, the individual or you, the company, nobody walks up to you, smacks you upside the head and walks off with your wallet. I mean, they do, unfortunately, sometimes, but in the digital world that can happen so easily, so effectively and we just don’t know it’s, don’t know it’s occurred.

[00:12:43] It’s the same thing here. We always talk about it when we talk about, um, uh, we talk about insider threats or we talk about how long somebody has been inside a company for, you know, meantime to discovery, and that number is unfortunately increased as time has gone by because the adversary has gotten more sophisticated. Well,

[00:13:02] if you put it in the real world, how quickly would you know that somebody is living in your home? Hopefully, pretty quickly, I mean. I got three Great Danes of which they’ll occasionally pop up on the screen here once in a while. Those Great Danes will tell me very, very quickly who’s in my house. I would know by rattling the door, looking at the windows, the cameras, all these other things would help me understand that somebody is creeping around the house. In the digital world

[00:13:28] we don’t have that, we haven’t gotten that sorted out properly. It’s not as effective as it should be and unfortunately, we don’t have that awareness. So when you look at who should listen in, I’d almost argue everybody, you know. I hope, and I would hope that my mother will listen to it on these. I’ll probably get the telephone call and, “Christopher,” but at the same time, I want my mother to understand that the computer or the iPad or the devices she has, has some amazing capabilities,

[00:13:57] but it should also come with some warning signs, which unfortunately they don’t. So when you use certain programs or when you use certain software, when you interact with certain services and systems, you should at least understand what you are handing over and unfortunately, most people don’t. So when you think about it, and it doesn’t say “don’t do it,” it’s not saying “don’t use it” ’cause that’ll never happen,

[00:14:18] it’s at least going with your eyes wide open. So I think that’s one side of it, which is, like, who should listen. And, we look at the “why’s.” Now, this is where the fun turns up. This is, I’m kind of looking forward to this ’cause, I mean, Dani, is you and I have been working on this

[00:14:31] now for a while, we’ve got some really core pieces of the jigsaw puzzle.

[00:14:36] We’re not focusing just on one thing. We’re going to take the jigsaw puzzle, which is really intelligence and data and go, “Hey, how would leadership do something with it? How would somebody who’s frontline do something with it? How would an analyst deal with it? How do we deal with it? How do we find it? What is it?”

[00:14:55] You start breaking all of this down and all of a sudden that jigsaw puzzle that is that nebulous darknet starts getting a bit of a light shown on it. You start to see, “Hey, this is why we look at it. This is why this is useful.” Now, we’ve used this analogy a couple of times as we’ve talked behind the scenes, we all talk about a perimeter, you know, in security there is a goal of “secure the perimeter” in housing, in the real world,

[00:15:21] I want to secure my walls, whereas unfortunately, in the digital world that perimeter doesn’t exist. It’s gone. Bye-bye, have a nice day, enjoy your day. That’s everywhere. But just sitting there still thinking you have a perimeter is unfortunately not a good position to be in, much better to have something that tells you what’s over the horizon,

[00:15:42] what’s coming at you. Is it trebuchet, you know, “I kind of care about it.” Maybe. Is it somebody running along with a club? Probably me, the neanderthal, let’s face it, or is somebody basically sitting way over the hillside with an extra set of missiles pointed at you, at which point you kind of want to know about it. So it’s helping the various people understand why these bits of the jigsaw are useful,

[00:16:04] who they are useful to in an organization, you know, is it a leadership risk decision, is it a tactical decision about a human or a piece of technology? Is it an awareness discussion to have with the technical teams, the development teams, the systems teams, the standard users to go, “Hey, guess what? You know, our leadership is a bit vocal and we’re out on the internet a lot.

[00:16:27] You’re all at risk. Here’s how to help you understand the types of risks that you’re facing.” Anything, it’s so useful for anybody, just depends upon which tool you want to use. Yeah. 

[00:16:37] Dani Woolf: And so, we’re going to be bringing on, like, who’s our audience that we’re going to be bringing on to, to explore these, these issues and to tinker around on the dark web?

[00:16:47] Chris Roberts: Yeah, I think that’s going to be fun. ‘Cause, I mean, we are going to have, we’re going to have senior leadership. I mean, I’m looking forward to bringing on some really, really good friends to talk about what they’re doing with intelligence, to talk about what they’re doing inside their organizations, where their backgrounds come from with threat intelligence, how are they using this threat intelligence,

[00:17:05] as well as actually, I want people, I’m really looking forward to digging into the knowledge and experience that Cybersixgill brings. Quite honestly, I get to, I, I’m the kid in the toy store. I’m kind of having some fun with this ’cause I get to go to the analyst and go, “Hey, can I borrow one of you fellow?” Well, oh, half an hour’s worth of conversation.”

[00:17:22] Chris Roberts: “What the heck do you do? And, by the way, how does beyond you speak Russian? And, this and that. How the smurf do you change all of these conversations from 60, 70, 80 different languages into something I can understand?” And so, that’s going to be a fantastic conversation. Then we’re going to have conversations with some of the other folks inside. They’re going, “Hey, we know tactics change.

[00:17:48] We know, years ago, we all sat there with smoke signals, semaphores and carrier pigeons. Now we sit on encrypted channels and IRC and ICQ and ITP and all these other acronyms that we’ve created for the shared giggle of keeping everybody excluded.” By the way, we’re going to talk about acronyms as well, but we’re going to have people help us understand how tactics work and what tactics and how we modify and how we advance them because they continually change.

[00:18:13] I think this is what another one of the things of security, you know. Every becomes and it goes, “IOL solve your problems.” Actually, no, you don’t. This is a journey. This isn’t going to end. So the more you understand the theater that you’re operating, the more you understand the situations, you have that situation awareness, the better the chance you have of actually staying on this path of this journey and not getting sideswiped by somebody who’s basically wanting to take it all from you. 

[00:18:46] Dani Woolf: Is it about catching up or being ahead of the adversary?

[00:18:50] Chris Roberts: You now, that is a loaded question, isn’t it? My gosh. I think famous last words, I honestly think it’s about understanding. The best that we can do is look at the landscape and go “What’s happened?” And, we can go, “What’s happened?” then we can go, theoretically, “What’s likely to happen?” And, we can do that with information,

[00:19:14] you know, it’s predictive. You start looking at algorithms as humans. Um, if you look at the credit card perfect example, the credit card industry has that predictive algorithm for, I don’t know, around 20, 30 years. Um, one very well-known credit card company is very, very good at saying, “Well, we know you’re there because we predicted you take an airline flight,”

[00:19:34] so if we can get to a point with all the information and all the darker side of the stuff that we pull out and we can start correlating that and understanding actors, threat actors, individuals, teams, groups, adversaries reasons why because not everybody is waving a flag and going, “I’m going to fight you because of my country.” No. Hack no.

[00:19:57] I might just not like the look of your leadership because the person that’s in charge is an absolute womble who’s all over the internet and I just don’t like them, or you might be operating in a country that I really don’t want you operating, and you might be digging up the side of a mountain to provide the minerals and stuff that goes into my electronics

[00:20:15] and I don’t like you because of that. Whatever my reasons, the better we understand those, the better chance we have of hopefully going from, “Hey, we react,” to something where we can get more predictive. I don’t think we’ll ever get ahead, but what I want to be able to do is at least go, “Hey, from situational awareness, these are the three or four potential scenarios.

[00:20:39] Here are the risks. Here’s the awareness. Here’s the understanding. Here’s what you can do from a tactics procedure standpoint to better protect yourself.” 

[00:20:49] There are a lot of security podcasts out there. How is this one particularly different or complementary to others out there?

[00:20:58] Chris Roberts: So I think this one’s going to be complementary in some ways. I think because we have such a diverse, uh, schedule, fundamental way of putting it. I mean, if you think about it, I mean, again, Dani, you’ve done an amazing job. I’m looking at the spreadsheet for the next, basically, 12 months and there’s a ton of it filled in, for everybody that’s listening into this,

[00:21:17] it’s, it’s crazy. It’s amazing, the amount that’s gone into this. And, I think what I love about it as, as you know, I think what’s, what did Meira call me, the Brand Ambassador, I get to rifle through all of this fun stuff and go, “Hey, let’s have a conversation about this, this and this. It’s really, really cool.”

[00:21:33] So for me, it’s complimentary, uh, in some ways. I also think there isn’t a very good, consistent message when it comes to using stuff that’s basically hidden on the darker side of the internet when it comes to talking about threat intelligence, uh, and we’re talking actual threat intelligence. We’re not talking some of the crazy stuff that people market,

[00:21:55] we’ll get into that one episode, I’m sure, and that’ll, that’ll be, uh, it’ll be bun fights at dawn with a couple of other organizations out there. For me, I think it’ll be fun because what we do is we’ll take a situation, we can apply the discussion to it, we can apply an educational discussion. Again, I want my mother to look at this and go, “I understand what’s going on.”

[00:22:18] I also want to put a leadership twist on this and go, “Hey, how can you use this effectively?” And then, let’s face it. We have an open mic session as well, which is, you know, the crazy doctor dark web stuff that I’m totally looking forward to. There’s a part of me that’s geeking out about it, but there’s also a part of me that doesn’t want the ego to walk through the door, you know, five minutes before I do,

[00:22:38] so I’m having to balance that very, very carefully. And, a very good friend of mine has promised if I actually, if my ego starts getting ahead of me, he’s already got one of the, uh, one of the shotguns loaded up with wax loads, so I have that as my guiding principles for maintaining a level head, shall we say. So

[00:22:56] no, I think it would be fun. It’s, um, I think the other part of it is as well is, I’ve got to give, uh, Cybersixgill some credit here on this one, and I’m going to give the credit for a couple of reasons. There

[00:23:07] are other podcasts that are put out by respective organizations and companies, but they’re so heavily branded, they’re so heavily,

[00:23:17] I saw one, I was a, and it wasn’t a podcast, it was a, a spreadsheet, it was like, uh, “How to fix the internet spreadsheet given by one of the companies?” It was like, “Well, this is the problem and this is how we fix it. And, this is, um, this is how we fix it.” I’m like, “No, you can’t be all things to all people. You can’t fix everything.”

[00:23:34] So I think what I love about this is Cybersixgillsaid, “Hey, we’re going to put this out. We’re doing this for the good of the community. We’re doing it for the good of the people. If we get something out of it, fantastic. This is, it’s kind of cool, you know, everybody’s got to put food on the table, but at the end of the day, we’re doing it because everybody’s got to understand this is where the future’s going.” 

[00:23:53] Dani Woolf: Yeah, a hundred percent. I love that. And you know, you had mentioned mission before money, and I’m a strong believer in that. And, and so, so this is all good. We have a lot coming up, you know, a lot down coming down the pipe, a lot of topics, uh, practical, pragmatic information, great people in, in the pipeline, uh, that will join us.

[00:24:14] So what, uh, when, when are we getting, like, we’re doing this weekly, right? What is the here? 

[00:24:19] Chris Roberts: Yeah. Yeah, this is crazy. It’s weekly. It’s going to be fun. I’m actually looking forward to it. I mean, it’s, it’s, you know, again, I’m fortunate. I, I’ve got to give you and the team a ton of credit. I get the easy job, let’s be honest. I get to kind of show up, wave my hands around a whole bunch, I have a little bit of fun, put some stuff in here, and I get sit back and put my feet up and have a cup of tea, which is actually rather civilized,

[00:24:40] and unless you’ve. Or at this time of night because again, I think, from the viewership standpoint, uh, the intro says it all, which is like, it’s good morning, afternoon and evening because for those of you listening, we are literally not far, what are we, nine hours, nine hours difference? Yeah. Nine hours difference apart.

[00:24:56] So you can go do your math and figure out all that shenanigans, but we’re about a third of the way across the planet from each other, and I think that’s the other fun part about it as well. This, this, I don’t want this to be, like, a fully centric to one part of the geography or other. I’m looking forward to digging into it,

[00:25:14] you know, if we go to the Indian continent, how were they using intelligence as they’re building out? How is, you know, how the heck is Australia doing anything? I mean, you know, a bunch of bloody kangaroos and freaking koalas, I mean, you know. And, New Zealand. New Zealand to me, you know, everybody goes, “Where are all the breaches coming from?”

[00:25:31] And I’m like, “Oh, it’s New Zealand. New Zealand’s got all that.” New Zealand’s got all the attackers and adversaries. I mean, that country is amazing. I think it’s that hidden gem, somewhere in the middle of New Zealand there’s this entire nest of, of basically me and it’s only because I want to get my ass over then one day and actually go hang out.

[00:25:47] But yeah, I think New Zealand will emerge as the new cyber power one day, just for the heck of it. 

[00:25:53] Dani Woolf: I love it. I love it. So we’re, what are we, on the major streamers, right? We’re going to be on major streamers on the cyber web, Cybersixgill website. Where can you find, um, where can we find Dr. Dark Web?

[00:26:03] Chris Roberts: I, hopefully everywhere. I mean, I look forward to putting this out. I’m, I’m going to be putting the episodes and stuff out on, uh, on LinkedIn. And, to your point, the major streamers, we should have it on all the major streamers, so if you sitting there with your Apple device or your Android device or your, you know,

[00:26:19] CrackBerry device or any other device you should better get hold of us no matter what. Yeah, but I’m definitely, it’s going to go up on LinkedIn. It’ll go up on Twitter, to your point Dani, it’s going to be up on the Cybersixgill podcast, part of the site. If I can, I’ll probably check it up on the HillBilly Hit Squad website as well.

[00:26:34] So we’ll have some fun with it. I’m looking forward to putting this out everywhere. 

[00:26:38] Dani Woolf: And what, uh, what do you want to sign off with? What would you want to tell the audience that’s, that’s important to you? Anything.

[00:26:45] Chris Roberts: I think it’s, for me, and I think this is why I like doing this, is we are going to have the opportunity to get people to ask questions, and I think what we’re also going to do is help people understand what’s going on in a probably slightly sarcastic, slightly civilized-ish English, Scottish kind of blunt way.

[00:27:11] But doing it in such a manner that everybody should be able to understand it. There are no pretenses here, exactly to what you said, it’s a mission-before-money discussion. How can we help you? How can we help you understand? How can we help you just ask one more question? You know, that to me is the biggest, this is why we have a Q&A session set up, you know, every couple of weeks, deliberately for that.

[00:27:35] So it’s, to me it’s like, come along, hang out, bring your questions and, and let’s, let’s go explore. Let’s go see what is hiding under the covers. 

[00:27:46] Dani Woolf: All right. See you soon. 

[00:27:47] Chris Roberts: See you soon.